10/30/20 01:45:47 UTC
321.000 MHz
WAUCONDA, IL
UPSET41 landing in 20min with 23K fuel
 
10/29/20 19:35:46 UTC
135.750 MHz
TAMPA, FL
JEDI 33, 37 and 54 (T-6As ) heading out of MacDill.
 
10/29/20 17:24:11 UTC
119.500 MHz
TAMPA, FL
Air Force One landing at Tampa Intl.
 
10/29/20 15:58:16 UTC
235.100 MHz
TAMPA, FL
a/a refueling and training
 
10/29/20 15:57:17 UTC
317.600 MHz
TAMPA, FL
RAPTOR1
 

10/28/20 21:59:39 UTC
149.6500 MHz
"...2-7 is turning inbound, 1 bundle, 5 jumpers..." 10/28/2020, 1352h. -AJ
 
10/28/20 21:57:43 UTC
38.700 MHz
A2A "ZEUS12, 22. Show you're about 8.5 miles away from us, are you behind us?.....Sierra-Delta-Zulu (SDZ VOR)..." Signal kinda in and out, but strangely very clear and neither pilot had any noticable background noise (helicopter sounds) as if using new type of mic. Prev logged this in use for ZEUS(H64s) training in 2018 near KVUJ. 10/27/2020, 1415h. -AJ
 
10/27/20 17:49:48 UTC
38.700 MHz
"...H1's, currently Chesterfield, Charlie-Tango-Foxtrot (CHESTERFIELD VOR/DME, CTF), en route to ????bruice???, one hour out..." Oddly excellent, near perfect reception, though CTF is nearly 60 miles distant. The destination part sounded like "tango-bruice", so reception obviously less than perfect. 10/27/2020, 1228h. -AJ
 
10/27/20 17:42:55 UTC
336.100 MHz
"...glad you're on frequency and let us know when you're en route so you can give us an idea of the time..." 10/26/2020, 1233h. -AJ
 
10/27/20 17:41:11 UTC
32.450 MHz
"...uh Alpha 5-3-1 (A-531) here in Montgomery county, Daniel wanted me to let you know" 10/26/2020, 1925h. -AJ
 
10/27/20 15:31:18 UTC
293.000 MHz
"...off Mid-Carolina (KRUQ), en route to Mackall (KHFF)" 10/26/2020, 1918h. -AJ
 
10/26/20 17:28:30 UTC
141.550 MHz
"...Andrews...this is PAT(##)..." Very weak rx, single snippit. 10/20/2020, 2007h. -AJ
 

ARINC AVS Operating Procedures Handbook-2017

Aviation Voice Services Operating Procedures Handbook

Prepared by:

Aviation Voice Services

Program Management Office

2551 Riva Rd

Annapolis, MD 21401

June 28, 2017

1

 

ACRONYMS

ACARS

Aircraft Communications Addressing and Reporting System

A/G

Air/Ground

AFTN

Aeronautical Fixed Telecommunications Network

AOC

Aeronautical Operational Control

ARTCC

Air Route Traffic Control Center

ASRI

Aviation Spectrum Resources, Inc.

ATC

Air Traffic Control

AviNet®

Integrated network of message processing and switching processors

AVS

Aviation Voice Services

CAR

Caribbean

CEP

Central East Pacific

CFR

Code of Federal Regulations

CPDLC

Controller Pilot Data Link Communication

CWP

Central West Pacific

DTMF

Dual Tone Multi-Frequency

FAA

Federal Aviation Administration

FIR

Flight Information Region

GES

Ground Earth Station

GoM

Gulf of Mexico

HF

High Frequency

ICAO

International Civil Aviation Organization

INMARSAT

International Maritime Satellite Telecommunications Company

LDOCF

Long Distance Operational Control Facility

MWARA

Major World Air Route Area

NAT

North Atlantic

NP

North Pacific

RO

Radio Operator

SATCOM

Satellite Communications

SATVOICE

Satellite Voice

SELCAL

Selective Calling System

SMI

Standard Message Identifier

SMT

Standard Message Text

SP

South Pacific

SSB

Single Sideband

TEI

Text Element Identifier

VHF

Very High Frequency

Aviation Voice Services - Operating Procedures Handbook

i

© 2017 Rockwell Collins. All rights reserved.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1

DESCRIPTION OF SERVICES .........................................................................

1

1.1

Air/Ground Domestic Radio .............................................................................

1

1.2

Air/Ground International Radio .......................................................................

1

1.2.1 Atlantic – HF Groups ................................................................................

2

1.2.2 Pacific – HF Groups .................................................................................

2

2

COVERAGE AREAS ........................................................................................

4

3

PROCEDURES ...............................................................................................

6

3.1

Air-to-Ground Calling .....................................................................................

6

3.2

Ground-to-Air Calling .....................................................................................

6

3.3

SatVoice ......................................................................................................

7

3.4

VHF Self-Serve Phone Patch ...........................................................................

7

3.4.1

Air-to-Ground DTMF Dialing .....................................................................

7

3.4.2

Ground-to-Air Dialing ..............................................................................

9

4

SELECTIVE CALLING SYSTEM (SELCAL) ......................................................

11

4.1

Description of Service ..................................................................................

11

4.2

Operation ...................................................................................................

11

4.3

SELCAL Tones ............................................................................................

11

5

PERMISSIBLE COMMUNICATIONS ..............................................................

12

6

AVINET AND AFTN MESSAGES ....................................................................

13

6.1

Message Format .........................................................................................

13

6.1.1 Standard Message Identifiers (SMIs) ........................................................

13

6.1.2 Text Element Identifiers (TEIs) ................................................................

13

7

COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTORY .................................................................

15

7.1

Radio Operations ........................................................................................

15

7.2

Air-to-Ground SatVoice ................................................................................

15

7.3

Administrative .............................................................................................

15

Aviation Voice Services - Operating Procedures Handbook

ii

© 2017 Rockwell Collins. All rights reserved.

1 DESCRIPTION OF SERVICES

ARINC, Incorporated doing business as Rockwell Collins, Information Management Services (IMS), has been providing operational communications services to the aviation industry since 1929.

The Air/Ground Voice Services are provided by communications centers located in Islip, New York and Livermore, CA, and encompass Air Traffic Control (ATC) communications for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and Aeronautical Operational Control (AOC) communication services for the airlines and other aircraft operators. High Frequency (HF) and Very High Frequency (VHF) voice radio are the primary means of air/ground communications, supplemented by data link, International Maritime Satellite Telecommunications Company (INMARSAT) and Iridium Satellite Voice Communications (SATVOICE).

ARINC Air/Ground communications services primarily consist of radio relay – passing information between aircraft and the FAA or their company dispatch center. This relay occurs in the form of message transcription and the establishment of a radio-to-telephone communications link, called a phone patch, to give customer operations personnel the ability to talk directly to aircrews over ARINC radio systems. These systems have the capability to conference in additional parties such as maintenance offices and in-flight medical consultation services. Additionally, communications centers can provide weather reports and forecasts on request.

To ensure that domestic and flag air carriers comply with FAR 121.711, all company radio frequencies and facilities (including VHF enroute networks and all incoming/outgoing phone lines) are continuously recorded at each communications center. Where the two communications centers are on the same frequency or frequencies, recordings are made for each. An air carrier’s or aircraft operator’s authorized representative may request an audio recording and/or message file(s) of their aircraft’s communications with a Communications Center. Audio files are retained for 45 days from the date of the recording.

1.1AIR/GROUND DOMESTIC RADIO

The Air/Ground Domestic Radio (AGDR) service provides communication relay services via phone patch or AviNet Messaging to aircraft operating above the contiguous United States, Mexico, and the west coast of Canada and Alaska. These services are provided utilizing a network of over 109 VHF radios. See the ARINC 1 and 5 Jeppesen Charts for coverage areas and corresponding frequencies. See the ARINC 2 and 6 Jeppesen charts for a list of on- ground coverage in the United States and Mexico.

1.2AIR/GROUND INTERNATIONAL RADIO

The Air/Ground International Radio (AGIR) service provides radio relay services to aircraft operating in oceanic airspace or in coastal regions of the U.S., Canada, Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean. These services are provided by both HF and VHF radio.

ATC communications services are provided for the FAA in the Anchorage, Houston, Miami, New York, and Oakland Flight Information Regions (FIRs) and the San Juan CERAP airspace on Major World Air Route Area (MWARA) HF radio frequencies. Coastal VHF communications are used for transitioning aircraft between domestic and oceanic airspace as well as

Aviation Voice Services - Operating Procedures Handbook

1

© 2017 Rockwell Collins. All rights reserved.

communicating with non-HF equipped aircraft operating near domestic boundaries. As part of the AGIR communications service, airlines can have aircraft position reports dual routed to the FAA and the company dispatch office for flight following.

1.2.1Atlantic – HF Groups

NAT (North Atlantic): The North Atlantic area of responsibility extends from the Moncton (CZQM) boundary south of Nova Scotia east to the Gander (CZQX) boundary south of Newfoundland at 4430N. The boundary then extends to Santa Maria (LPPO) boundary at 040W. The boundary with Santa Maria at 40W extends from 44030N to 2219N. The Piarco (TTZP) boundary extends from 2219N040W to 18N045W and continues west at 18N to 6130W at the San Juan (TJZS) boundary. The boundary then extends north at 60W to 4430N.

CAR (Caribbean): The Caribbean area of responsibility extends from approximately 39N060W south to the San Juan (TJZS) boundary at 18N06130W. The boundary then extends westward north of the Caribbean islands (St. Kitts, Guadeloupe, Antigua, Martinique), north of Puerto Rico and to the Miami boundary north of the Bahamas to 28N076W. CAR Extends northward to the boundaries with Jacksonville (KZJX) and New York ARTCC (KZNY) from 32N077W to 35N072W. The New York boundary extends to 39N067W again out to 39N060W.

1.2.2Pacific – HF Groups

NP (North Pacific): The North Pacific is considered to be above 37N and west of 150W, west to the Tokyo FIR at 165E, and includes the Anchorage FIR and Russian Airspace. Some checkpoints along the Aleutian chain are in VHF range of remote relay stations; therefore, Anchorage controllers communicate directly with flights along much of their route. Tokyo Radio is the only other radio station using the North Pacific frequency groups

NP/Polar Routes: Anchorage ARTCC’s current radio voice capabilities in the Arctic CTA do not extend past N75°. Lack of satellite coverage in the polar region affects CPDLC coverage as well. Because of the lack of ATC communications available in the Polar region, SFO provides communications using the NP1 HF family as primary and the Barrow, Alaska LDOCF as a secondary means for these aircraft.

CWP (Central West Pacific): The frequencies of the Central West Pacific family cover a vast amount of territory. The boundaries of the Oakland FIR have neighboring control authorities and radio stations. San Francisco shares this frequency group with Tokyo, Manila, and Port Moresby. The West Pacific frequencies are divided into 2 groups. CWP- 1 generally works flights east of 170E and flights traveling between Honolulu and the Orient, and CWP-2 works flights in the Guam area, west of 170E.

SP (South Pacific): Most flights traveling to and from the South Pacific operate during the mid-shift. Generally, the lower frequencies of the SP family are reliable during these hours. Several ground stations share this group: Brisbane, Auckland, Nadi, Tahiti, and San Francisco. Station interference is not normally a problem. Most flights leave SFO radio guard and enter Nadi’s guard. Nadi radio operators (ROs) occasionally work traffic well into the SFO guard area when atmospheric conditions make reading the flights difficult.

CEP (Central East Pacific): The Central East Pacific has composite route structures which primarily cover the areas between the Continental United States and Hawaii. It also covers the route structures between Canada and Hawaii. When assuming radio guard on CEP

Aviation Voice Services - Operating Procedures Handbook

2

© 2017 Rockwell Collins. All rights reserved.

flights, flights will monitor the primary and secondary HF assignment and set the aircraft transponder unit on code 2000 (also called Squawk Code).

Aviation Voice Services - Operating Procedures Handbook

3

© 2017 Rockwell Collins. All rights reserved.

2

COVERAGE AREAS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Control

 

Coverage

 

 

VHF

 

 

HF

 

Jeppesen

 

 

Point

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chart

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eastern U.S.

 

129.9 MHz

 

 

 

ARINC-1/2

 

 

 

 

 

Maritime Canada

 

 

 

 

ARINC-3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATC - As assigned

 

 

 

 

 

 

North Atlantic

 

N/A

 

ARINC-3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AOC - All LDOCF

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New York

 

 

Gulf of Mexico

 

 

 

 

Frequencies

ARINC-1/2

 

 

 

 

 

 

130.7 MHz

 

 

 

ARINC-3

 

 

 

 

 

Caribbean

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ARINC-5/6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

South America

 

N/A

 

AOC - All LDOCF

ARINC-9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frequencies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pacific Coast

 

131.95 MHz

 

 

 

ARINC-1/2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ARINC-4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATC - As assigned

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coastal Alaska

 

129.4 MHz

 

ARINC-1/2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AOC - All LDOCF

ARINC-4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frequencies

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pacific Ocean

 

N/A

 

ARINC-4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

San

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hawaii, Guam

 

131.95 MHz

 

 

 

ARINC-4

 

Francisco

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Domestic U.S.

 

Various

 

N/A

ARINC-1/2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mexico

 

130.7 MHz

 

 

 

ARINC-5/6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coastal Asia

 

N/A

 

AOC - All LDOCF

ARINC-4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frequencies

ARINC-7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

North Pole

 

N/A

 

 

 

ARINC-4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aviation Voice Services - Operating Procedures Handbook

4

© 2017 Rockwell Collins. All rights reserved.

ARINC operates 7 Long Distance Operational Control (LDOC) facilities which provide AOC communications to customers throughout the following regions; North Atlantic, South/Central American, Caribbean, Pacific and North Pole.

All aircraft operating on international routes in these areas of the world should maintain a listening watch or SELCAL guard on the appropriate ICAO MWARA frequencies.

ARINC LDOC stations operate on the same set of HF frequencies for ease of use and overlap between stations. Flight crews operating can expect to continue to pass routine Air/Ground messages on the ICAO MWARA enroute radio telephone HF or VHF networks.

ARINC LDOC Frequencies

3494 kHz

6640 kHz

8933 kHz

11348 kHz

13348 kHz

17925 kHz

21964 kHz

Aviation Voice Services - Operating Procedures Handbook

5

© 2017 Rockwell Collins. All rights reserved.

3PROCEDURES

3.1AIR-TO-GROUND CALLING

Prior to flight, the aircrew or the dispatch center can receive primary and secondary frequency assignments from the Communications Center based on geographic location and time of day. Additionally, the Communications Centers can add the dispatch center to distribution of regularly published frequency assignment e-mail broadcast messages so the best frequencies are always available within the customer operation.

If company communications are required during flight, an LDOC frequency assignment can be requested from the ARINC Radio Operator handling that flight’s ATC communications.

For all of the HF and VHF frequencies, international and domestic regions, flight crews should be prepared to include the following information when transmitting a company message to a Communications Center by voice:

1.Aircraft flight identification as filed in the flight plan and currently being used in communications with air traffic control facilities and aircraft registration.

2.Transmitting frequency.

3.Message delivery instructions and Service Agreement number; if the Service Agreement number is not readily available (in the aircraft), the name of the company operating the aircraft should suffice.

4.Aircraft SELCAL code, if applicable.

Example:

 

Flight:

“San Francisco, this is ACME four-two on eight-niner-tree-tree.”

Operator:

“ACME for-two, San Francisco, Go Ahead.”

Flight:

“San Francisco, ACME four-two, SELCAL AQ-HS, Request Phone Patch with

 

company dispatch.”

Radio Operators transcribe all Air/Ground messages for immediate transmission through AviNet® messaging system (or via telephone if the customer does not have AviNet or AFTN messaging capabilities).

The flight crews should transmit their messages at a moderate speed to prevent unnecessary repeating. During transmission of a lengthy message, the flight crew should pause at intervals to ensure that the radio operator has the message complete to that point.

3.2GROUND-TO-AIR CALLING

For Ground to Air communications, a ground party simply needs to contact the Communications Center responsible for the airspace where the aircraft is located using the information provided in the communications directory (Section 7). Note that aircraft need to be guarding ARINC frequencies in order to be heard by ARINC Radio Operators. When contacting a Communications Center to request contact with an aircraft, the caller should

Aviation Voice Services - Operating Procedures Handbook

6

© 2017 Rockwell Collins. All rights reserved.

have approximate aircraft position, SELCAL, and callsign/flight ID information readily available to give to the Radio Operator.

3.3SATVOICE

ARINC can establish SATVOICE contact/message transcription and relay between aircraft/ground parties. For Air-to-Ground dialing, aircraft should use the SATVOICE short codes listed in Section 7, or dial the full phone number listed. When requesting Ground-to- Air call setup, please be prepared to provide aircraft Octal Codes. ARINC has a record of aircraft Octal Codes for most aircraft that transit the U.S. airspace. In some cases the Octal Code of the aircraft may have to be presented to the ARINC Radio Operator.

3.4VHF SELF-SERVE PHONE PATCH

The ARINC radio system in the domestic U.S. and Mexico have additional features that allow customers to set up phone patches without the assistance of a Radio Operator. These features are not available on HF radio systems or on VHF radio systems in the Caribbean or east/west coast VHF nets.

3.4.1Air-to-Ground DTMF Dialing

If the aircraft if equipped with a Dual-Tone Multi Frequency (DTMF) microphone, the ARINC radio system can be pre-programmed with speed dial number accessible by the customer aircraft to automatically dial the destination number.

DTMF microphones allow direct phone patch connections Air-to-Ground VHF networks managed by San Francisco. Prior coordination with ARINC is necessary to set up customer access and office phone numbers in the system. ARINC will assign and configure 5-digit dialing numbers for ground party numbers designated by the customer.

To initiate a DTMF call on the Domestic VHF networks, complete the following:

1.Setup and Dial Procedure

Tune VHF radio to area or ground frequency relative to the aircraft position shown on the Jeppesen ARINC-1 and ARINC-2 charts. Monitor the network for several seconds to see if it is already in use.

Push and hold the "Push to Talk" button on a DTMF equipped aircraft microphone.

Carefully key in the three-digit airline code followed by the two-digit “call to” location number.

Press the # key within 20 seconds of the last digit entered to “launch” the call.

Release the “Push to Talk” button after the five-digit and # tone sequence is transmitted.

Monitor the frequency while the ground system dials the phone number and ground party answers.

When the call is connected, conduct the call like any simplex phone patch using normal radio telephony procedures.

Press 0 # at the end of calls to terminate the call and release the network.

2.Assistance Notes

Aviation Voice Services - Operating Procedures Handbook

7

© 2017 Rockwell Collins. All rights reserved.

If an error is made while dialing, press * to clear all previous digits entered.

Call setup takes approximately 5-10 seconds.

A three-tone signal is heard when the dialing sequence is unsuccessful.

Press 0 # to disconnect all calls.

The ground party may disconnect the call by ‘hanging up’.

3.Radio Operator Assistance

Operator assistance is available at all times by pressing the 0 # keys to terminate the existing call; initiate standard Domestic Voice Operations procedures to reach a Radio Operator.

Note: Since the direct dial feature on the Domestic VHF networks does not involve the assistance of a Radio Operator, call logs including flight ID, tail number, and a summary of the information exchanged are not logged for these types of calls.

However, radio traffic audio is recorded and retained 45 days.

Aviation Voice Services - Operating Procedures Handbook

8

© 2017 Rockwell Collins. All rights reserved.

3.4.2Ground-to-Air Dialing

The domestic voice service has the capability for customers to directly access VHF networks using standard phone equipment and Company authorized access code. This allows operations and dispatch offices to make direct ground-to-air contact with their aircraft without Radio Operator intervention. Prior authorization and configuration by ARINC is required to use this Direct Access feature.

VHF Direct Access customers gain access to the networks using these specific procedures. From any touch-tone phone, perform the following:

1.Determine the location of your aircraft and identify the nearest VHF network to access.

2.Dial the access number (925) 371-1299.

3.After the ringing, a "chirp" and single "beep" will be heard.

4.After the beep, enter the Company access code and 2-digit network code (see Table 2-1).

5.If the correct access and network codes have been entered, a low-high 2-tone acknowledgment will be heard and the call will be connected.

6.If an incorrect access code or network code has been entered, three beeps will be heard and the call will be disconnected.

7.To change networks, you must hang up and redial.

Frequency

Network

Access Code

 

 

 

129.40

YN

01

 

 

 

131.175

MZ

02

 

 

 

129.45

IJ

03

 

 

 

128.90

JN

04

 

 

 

130.40

JD

05

 

 

 

131.80

KY

06

 

 

 

129.40

II

07

 

 

 

130.70

MX

08

 

 

 

Once the call is established:

1. Maintain silence for several seconds and monitor the network to see if it is in use.

Aviation Voice Services - Operating Procedures Handbook

9

© 2017 Rockwell Collins. All rights reserved.

2.Contact your aircraft.

3.Terminate the connection by hanging up the phone.

Standards for use:

1.Use only accepted phraseology and strict radio discipline.

2.Limit distribution of your access code to a small number of users.

3.For security purposes, it is not possible to change networks without hanging up and dialing back into the system.

4.Never use a speakerphone when using VHF Direct Access.

5.Keep background noise (e.g., typing, nearby conversations) to an absolute minimum when using this system.

6.Failure to comply with these standards will result in termination of Direct Access use.

Note: SELCAL is not supported over Dial Access and aircrews must guard VHF frequencies to receive Dial Access calls.

Aviation Voice Services - Operating Procedures Handbook

10

© 2017 Rockwell Collins. All rights reserved.

4 SELECTIVE CALLING SYSTEM (SELCAL)

4.1DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE

The Selective Calling System, known as SELCAL, is a signaling method to alert an individual aircraft that a ground station wishes to communicate with it. SELCAL signals can be transmitted over HF or VHF radio telephone channels. A SELCAL transmission consists of a combination of four pre-selected audio tones whose transmission requires approximately two seconds. The tones are generated in the Communications Center’s SELCAL encoder and are received by a decoder connected to the audio output of the aircraft receiver. Properly working SELCAL relieves the flight crew from maintaining a listening watch on assigned frequencies. This is especially useful on noisy HF channels.

4.2OPERATION

Receipt of the assigned SELCAL codes activates a cockpit call system in the form of a light, chime signals, or both. On aircraft equipped with SELCAL, the flight crew has the capability to also maintain a conventional listening watch using headsets or cockpit speaker. Due to technical incompatibilities, the HF SSB suppressed carrier mode of operation will not be used to transmit SELCAL signals. Many aircraft HF SSB transceivers are designed to detect SELCAL signals transmitted in the full carrier mode even though the transceiver mode selector switch is in the suppressed carrier mode. Those transceivers not designed with this feature must have the selector switch in the full carrier mode of operation to reliably detect a SELCAL signal. The mode selector switch must be restored to the suppressed carrier mode before making voice transmissions.

SELCAL codes are assigned to aircraft operators and not to individual aircraft. Aviation Spectrum Resources (ASRI) is the registrar of SELCAL codes worldwide. Contact ASRI for SELCAL code issuance or code changes of any nature using the contact information at the end of this document.

4.3SELCAL TONES

SELCAL units are based on 16 tone/letter assignments and are generally shared with more than one aircraft. ASRI as the SELCAL registrar, attempts to minimize assignment of duplicate SELCAL codes. This is accomplished by tracking SELCAL code assignment to the geographical area of operation. However, with jet aircraft, it is not uncommon to have more than one aircraft with the same SELCAL operating in the same geographical area at the same time. Owners of older aircraft should notify the ASRI SELCAL registrar of any change in geographical areas of operation. SELCAL systems are currently being expanded to include an additional 16 tones to increase the number of assignable codes and reduce duplicate assignments across the air transport industry.

Flight crews of SELCAL-equipped aircraft should be alert for possible duplication of SELCAL codes; listen closely to the Flight Identification (ID), as well as SELCAL, to avoid taking a clearance or other instructions meant for another flight.

Aviation Voice Services - Operating Procedures Handbook

11

© 2017 Rockwell Collins. All rights reserved.

5 PERMISSIBLE COMMUNICATIONS

Rockwell Collins is authorized to operate aviation radio stations in the aeronautical enroute band. These frequencies provide AOC communications to aircraft operators. It is through these radio stations that the aforementioned services are provided. ICAO defines AOC communications as those “required for the exercise of authority over the initiation, continuation, diversion, or termination of a flight in the interest of the safety of the aircraft and the regularity and efficiency of a flight”. The operation of these stations is governed by rules contained in CFR part 87 (Aviation Services). Allowable communications on these stations is strictly enforced as outlined in the Scope of Service section contained in CFR 87.261(a), which states, “Aeronautical enroute stations provide operational control communications to aircraft along domestic or international air routes. Operational control communications include the safe, efficient and economical operation of aircraft, such as fuel, weather, position reports, aircraft performance and essential services and supplies. Public correspondence is prohibited”.

Specific types of permissible communications include those pertaining to the following:

Communications relating to the initiation, continuation, diversion or termination of a flight.

Performance of the aircraft, including its components.

Aircraft servicing, including fueling, deicing and maintenance.

Information of value to a flight crew that will enable the safe and efficient completion of a flight.

Information of value to ground personnel concerned with the safe and efficient operation of a flight.

Information of value to other flights in the same area.

Information and corrections pertaining to weight, balance and passenger/cargo counts.

Urgent medical information.

Connections with other transportation (including ground transportation) and ongoing air transportation.

Provisioning of essential supplies and services.

The following types of communications are unacceptable, except in an emergency situation:

Public correspondence.

Personal messages to or from crew members or passengers.

All other communications that do not fall into the permissible communications category.

Radio Operators monitor all phone patches and will ensure that only permissible message traffic is handled. They are instructed to discontinue phone patches that contain unacceptable communications, and concerned users will be contacted as follow-up to these procedures.

Aviation Voice Services - Operating Procedures Handbook

12

© 2017 Rockwell Collins. All rights reserved.

6 AVINET AND AFTN MESSAGES

6.1MESSAGE FORMAT

Air/Ground messages transmitted from the Communications Centers are in Standard Message Text (SMT) format. A message type is identified by a Standard Message Identifier (SMI) on the first line of message text. Each element of message text is identified by a Text Element Identifier (TEI). An element of message text that cannot be associated with a TEI is entered as Free Talk. The Free Talk portion of the message is identified by a dash symbol followed by a space. The SMT format was developed primarily for airline use within their host computer flight management systems.

6.1.1Standard Message Identifiers (SMIs)

AEP

Position Report with Weather Information

AGM

Miscellaneous A/G Message

ALR

Alert Message

ARR

Arrival Report

DEP

Departure Report

DLA

Flight Delay

ETA

Estimated Time of Arrival

GVR

Ground-Originated Voice Request

POS

Position Report without Weather Information

6.1.2Text Element Identifiers (TEIs)

 

AD

Arrival Aerodrome

 

 

 

AF

Able Flight Level

 

 

 

AL

Altitude or Flight Level

 

 

 

AN

Aircraft Number

 

 

 

BF

Boarded Fuel (in gallons unless otherwise indicated)

 

 

 

CP

Cargo Payload

 

 

 

CZ

Cruising Speed

 

 

 

DA

Departure Aerodrome

 

 

 

DC

Delay Code

 

 

 

DS

Destination Station

 

 

 

DT

Communication Service Information

 

 

 

ED

Estimated Time of Departure

 

 

 

EN

Endurance (fuel endurance in hours and minutes)

 

 

 

EO

Estimated Time Over

 

 

 

FB

Fuel on Board (in lbs. unless otherwise indicated)

 

 

 

FI

Flight Identification

 

 

 

IC

Icing

 

 

 

IN

Time In

 

 

 

LP

Logbook Page

 

 

 

MN

Maintenance

 

 

 

NP

Next Report Point

 

 

 

OF

Time Off

 

 

 

ON

Time On

 

 

 

OS

Other Supplementary Information

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aviation Voice Services - Operating Procedures Handbook

13

 

 

 

© 2017 Rockwell Collins. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OT

Out Time

OV

Present Position Over

PB

Persons on Board

RF

Request Flight Level

RI

Return in Time

RO

Return on Time

RT

Route Information

SK

Sky Conditions

SL

SELCAL Code

TA

Static Air Temperature

TB

Turbulence

WV

Wind Information (Direction xxx, Speed xxx)

WX

Weather with no Assigned TEI

ZW

Zero Fuel Weight (in lbs. unless otherwise indicated)

Example - Departure Report:

QU JFKOOXX

SFOXGXA 121937

DEP

FI N1234/DA JFK/OT 1934/OF 1936/DS ORD 2145

DT SFO IH 121936 02

Decoded:

DEPARTURE REPORT FOR N1234, DEPARTED KENNEDY (JFK) OUT OF BLOCKS 1934Z, OFF 1936Z, ESTIMATING DESTINATION STATION O’HARE (ORD) AT 2145Z

Example - Int’l Position Report with Weather:

QU SFOOOXX FAAOOXA

SFOXGXA 122020

AEP

FI N1234/OV BAART 2016 F290/EO BARAZ 2105/NP BILLO

TA MS40/WV 260010/SK CLR/TB SMTH

DT SFO VE A 122020 15

Decoded:

INTERNATIONAL POSITION REPORT FOR N1234, OVER FIX BAART AT 2016Z, AT FL290, ESTIMATING OVER FIX BARAZ AT 2105Z, NEXT FIX BILLO, TEMPERATURE MINUS FORTY DEGREES CELSIUS, WIND VELOCITY 260˚AT 010 KNOTS, SKY CLEAR, TURBULENCE SMOOTH.

Aviation Voice Services - Operating Procedures Handbook

14

© 2017 Rockwell Collins. All rights reserved.

7 COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTORY

7.1RADIO OPERATIONS

 

Center

 

 

Phone

 

AviNet

 

ICAO/AFTN

 

 

Email

 

 

Call Sign

 

 

 

 

 

(IATA)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NYC

 

(800) 645-1095

 

NYCXGXA

 

KNYCXAAG

 

ims-nycradio

 

New York

 

 

(631) 589-7272

 

 

@rockwellcollins.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SFO

 

(800) 621-0140

 

SFOXGXA

 

KSFOXAAG

 

ims-sforadio

 

San Francisco

 

 

(925) 294-8297

 

 

@rockwellcollins.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.2AIR-TO-GROUND SATVOICE

Center SATVOICE Short Code

NYC 436623

SFO436625

7.3ADMINISTRATIVE

 

Location

Mailing Address

Phone Number

Email

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NYC

 

613 Johnson Ave

(631) 244-2480

ims-nycmgr@rockwellcollins.com

 

 

Bohemia, NY 11716

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SFO

 

6011 Industrial Way

(925) 294-8400

ims-sfomgr@rockwellcollins.com

 

 

Livermore, CA 94551

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AVS PMO

 

2551 Riva Road

(410) 266-4264

IMS-Voice-Svcs@RockwellCollins.com

 

 

Annapolis, MD 21401

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ASRI

 

180 Admiral Cochrane Dr.

 

 

 

 

#300

(410) 266-6030

info@asri.aero

 

 

 

Annapolis, MD 21401

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For additional information or to download copies of Jeppesen charts, visit www.RockwellCollins.com and search for key words “ARINC Voice Service”.

Aviation Voice Services - Operating Procedures Handbook

15

© 2017 Rockwell Collins. All rights reserved.