06/04/20 19:58:30 UTC
343.700 MHz
SHAWNEE MISSION, KS
SPIRIT02
 
06/04/20 13:55:59 UTC
135.700 MHz
,
Boston (ZBW). ROCK 41 flight conducting random refueling on AR212. (ADSB shows callsign as ROMA82, KC-10, 79-1949). Handoff to 134.950.
 
06/04/20 02:09:45 UTC
123.875 MHz
,
ZBW, MAINE 85 and 86 refueling SHOCK 01 and NOMEX 01 in AR609, afterward SHOCK and NOMEX cleared into Viper Airspace from the floor to FL500 and cleared to switch to tactical. (via LiveATC)
 
06/03/20 15:43:05 UTC
253.7 MHz
WINTER HAVEN, FL
ACM training HOTAS Fox 2 & 3
 
05/30/20 20:11:01 UTC
234.8 MHz
ORMOND BEACH, FL
Noble3 in CAP for launch TFR has emergency, RTB JAX equest approach end cable
 

05/20/20 22:45:29 UTC
322.300 MHz
2x prev unk freqs KGSO-PIEDMONT TRIAD INTL-05/071 - COM REMOTE TRANS/REC 243.0, 269.225, 284.6, 290.325, 322.3, 327.075 U/S. 26 MAY 09:00 2020 UNTIL 26 MAY 14:00 2020. CREATED: 19 MAY 09:00 2020 -AJ
 
05/20/20 16:25:54 UTC
70.400 MHz
A2A, 2x helo pilots: "...just bee-boppin' around the Uwharries" "...target on the dam then run through some (?)D-P-M-R's(?)...following the river" "we're at 550AGL..yup we're 780" discussing last altimeter setting "that was hours ago tho, at Simmons" rx'd central Uwharries, PL 151.4. 1955-2015ish, local time. 5/13/2020 -AJ
 
05/19/20 19:38:09 UTC
322.300 MHz
2x prev unk freqs KGSO-PIEDMONT TRIAD INTL-05/071 - COM REMOTE TRANS/REC 243.0, 269.225, 284.6, 290.325, 322.3, 327.075 U/S. 26 MAY 09:00 2020 UNTIL 26 MAY 14:00 2020. CREATED: 19 MAY 09:00 2020 -AJ
 
05/19/20 19:36:54 UTC
284.600 MHz
2x prev unk freqs KGSO-PIEDMONT TRIAD INTL-05/071 - COM REMOTE TRANS/REC 243.0, 269.225, 284.6, 290.325, 322.3, 327.075 U/S. 26 MAY 09:00 2020 UNTIL 26 MAY 14:00 2020. CREATED: 19 MAY 09:00 2020 -AJ
 
05/15/20 19:22:10 UTC
50.125 MHz
Helos in Uwharrie vic "291.9" "try them again and then we'll RTB" "head back to point 227, pick up (?gimlin?)" "it's a good thing out PAX brought parachutes, we'll just drop em off here and call it good" (??i dunno what that means??) "ascend to 100 feet" "14,16, are you gonna drop (?sticks?) 192,193 and go straight to 194?" "gonna go straight to 195". Associated w/ comms heard on 69.425FM and possibly 38.725FM as well. 5/14/2020 approx 1837+h -AJ
 
05/15/20 15:03:39 UTC
50.125 MHz
Helos in Uwharrie vic "291.9" "try them again and then we'll RTB" "head back to point 227, pick up (?gimlin?)" "it's a good thing out PAX brought parachutes, we'll just drop em off here and call it good" (??i dunno what that means??) "ascend to 100 feet" "14,16, are you gonna drop (?sticks?) 192,193 and go straight to 194?" "gonna go straight to 195". Associated w/ comms heard on 69.425FM and possibly 38.725FM as well. 5/14/2020 approx 1837+h -AJ
 
05/15/20 14:53:45 UTC
69.425 MHz
ARMY 20327 attempts to contact KVUJ twr (was closed) then on 69.425FM a report of no contact & someone should try UHF. This followed by "291.9" (KVUJ UHF) being called out on 50.125FM by a different party. Repeat of failed contact on VHF by female pilot (heard earlier on 69.425FM) IDing as ARMY 20273. Considering valley location, good Rx. 5/14/2020 approx 1830+h -AJ
 


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Frequency Searching with Multiple Scanners


The best way to find new frequencies for your scanner is to use the "search mode". However for the Military Air UHF band to use 1 scanner to scan the entire band (225 MHz - 380 MHz) would take most scanners (assuming 100 ch/sec.) over 1 minute to scan the entire band. This simply is too long as most MilAir comms are very short and you'll be missing alot of frequencies. So the key is to use as many scanners as you have in your shake and dedicate several hours to searching. You'll be amazed at how many new frequencies you'll quickly add to your list.

Most of my searching is done with 6 Uniden BC-780XLT scanners. I will evenly divide the 225 - 380 MHz MilAir band between each of the scanners. Below is a photo of my bank of scanners used for searching. For full size picture please click on the photo below:



Here is an easy way to figure how to divide the workload depending on how many scanners you have. First, you are dealing with 155 MHz of spectrum (380 - 225 MHz = 155 MHz). You will want to plan on using a search step size of 25 KHz (several years ago milair frequencies were spaced at 50 KHz, however now they are 25 KHz). Also don't forget most of the milair comms are in AM mode. Now if you want to use 2 scanners to search the 225-380MHz range that is very easy, just put the first half (225.000 to 302.500 MHz) in 1 scanner and the second half (302.500 to 380.000 MHz) in your second scanner. Now instead of taking 60 seconds to scan the entire range you'll be doing it in 30 seconds, much better and more rewarding as you'll quickly be discovering new frequencies to listen to.

The more scanners the better. In my case I use 6 scanners so here is how I have search ranges arranged:

Scanner #1 225.000 - 250.000 MHz
Scanner #2 250.000 - 275.000 MHz
Scanner #3 275.000 - 300.000 MHz
Scanner #4 300.000 - 325.000 MHz
Scanner #5 325.000 - 350.000 MHz
Scanner #6 350.000 - 380.000 MHz


With 6 scanner and the above frequency arrangment I can cover the entire UHF MilAir band in about 10 seconds.

Here is another hint, be sure you do not have any frequencies locked out of the search from previous searchs. On the BC-780 scanner you simply put the scanner in search, then press and hold the L/O button until you hear a series of beeps, now all lock-outs have been cleared.

The first couple of times your scanners searches its assigned range you're going to have the scanner stop on a few birdies, simply lock them out. Also a scanner could stop on a frequency which you already know about, I lock those out as well to speed up the searching.

Another piece of advice regarding delay times. Most scanners allow you to adjust the "resume search time" from 2 seconds to infinity. On the BC-780's I set them up to not resume until I hit the search button again (infinity). This way I have time to write down the frequency before the scanner starts scanning again. Try writing down a frequency when you're excited or when severals scanners all stop on new catches! If there is a lot of action in your shack its harder than you think.

I hope this article helps you more efficiently search the MilAir UHF Bands!

If you want to see my complete monitoring station CLICK HERE.